Faculty Stories

From deepening the feedback in a class to enriching the social character of a course with social media, these faculty reinvigorated their courses through reflection, inquiry, and experimentation. Read their stories of creative teaching practice at Georgetown.


Business and Economics

  • Betsy Sigman: Google Earth Project

    A TLISI workshop alerted Betsy Sigman to the potential applications of Google Earth, a web application for exploring the globe visually. Google Earth has been used successfully in countless research projects, and Professor Sigman was interested in harnessing its potential for her Database Development and Management course.

  • Evaluating E-Commerce (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    What makes a successful e-commerce website? The CNDLS staff worked with Prof. Betsy Sigman to develop a set of indicators to measure the efficacy of e-commerce sites and built Digital Discernment, an interactive online tool for evaluating e-commerce sites.

  • Interview with Ed Soule

    Ed Soule shares some of his experiences with using real-world cases and experts to help students understand issues of business ethics and corporate social responsibility. He also shares his thoughts on how technology is changing the way he teaches.

  • Sandeep Dahiya: Rethinking the Traditional Lecture Model

    When Sandeep Dahiya looked out over a crowd of glazed eyes and drooped shoulders in his first-year Financial Markets class, he realized he had to re-think his traditional slide-based, teacher-centric approach in the classroom.


Cultural Studies

  • Bernie Cook: Deepening Critical Understanding of American Studies

    Although Film Studies programs have long kept a distinct separation between production courses and critical theory courses, Bernie Cook wondered how he could incorporate production into a critical theory class, and how this would help his students to think critically about American Studies.

  • Filming for Social Justice (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    In his course Social Justice Documentary Video, Dr. Cook engages students in the art of video production in order to enable them to reach one of his intended learning goals—developing critical arguments about history and culture in creative ways. By involving students in the entire process—from archival and original research to producing, filming and editing the film—Cook believes students gain unique skills, such as the ability to create visual evidence to support an argument.

  • Matthew Rudolph: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Through the lens of political and economic development, Matthew Rudolph’s course explored how difference has been addressed in the context of South Asia, a region renowned for its distinct ethnic, religious, and cultural communities. In shaping his course in light of the Doyle Initiative, Rudolph drew on the diversity of South Asia and of class participants to engage questions of identity, cross-cultural interaction, and tolerance.

  • Nadine Ehlers: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Nadine Ehlers has long understood that students in her Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies course come expecting to talk about difference, but she finds that they often assume the class will focus on topics such as race, gender, and sexuality. Students are often less comfortable with examining the complexity of identity and how ideas of ‘normal’ or ‘abnormal’ identities are created. To push her students into this more challenging territory, Ehlers found two pedagogical strategies particularly useful -- humor and shock.

  • Rodney Collins: Maps Blog Creates a Collective Experience
  • Using Twitter to Connect Thesis Writers

    Garrison LeMasters uses Twitter to connect thesis-writing undergraduates to one another, making the often-solitary writing process feel more communal.


Education

  • Andria Wisler: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    "Learning how to learn together is one way to learn how to live together," says Andria Wisler, whose Conflict Transformations course introduced students to both theory and practice in conflict resolution.

  • Heather Voke: Engelhard Experience

    Since joining the project in Fall of 2006, Heather has sought to approach mental health issues from the perspective of civic engagement, having her students make connections between theory and direct experience in the community.


English and Comparative Literature

  • Andrew Rubin: Building Critical Writing Skills through Blogging

    Andrew Rubin, one of the first faculty users of Georgetown Commons blogs, saw the benefits of the blog tool early on. But he also recognized a challenge that he would have to address if he were to establish a successful blog in his literature course: students would have to forego the informal "blogspeak" they associated with blogging and self-consciously adopt the voice, rhetorical style, and logical strength of more traditional writing forms.

  • Eddie Maloney: Making Thinking Visible with Course Blogs

    Eddie Maloney, professor in the English Department and Managing Director at CNDLS, is convinced that challenging students to write in unfamiliar spaces will increase the quality of their work. He contends that requiring students to post to a course blog encourages them to rethink their writing and carve out a fresh way of communicating.

  • Ellen Edwards: The Technological Evolution of Journalistic Writing

    Ellen Edwards, a seasoned journalist for the Washington Post, wanted to take a forward-looking approach to journalistic writing for her course Writing About the Arts. After a discussion with a colleague on the pedagogical benefits of blogging, Edwards decided to divide the class into groups, allowing students to work together to produce blogs that could creatively showcase their writing before presenting their ideas to real editors at the Washington Post.

  • Frank Ambrosio: Fostering Contemplative Reading Practice through Digital Technology

    In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination, Frank Ambrosio found it difficult to teach students to move beyond basic levels of interpretation and to relate Dante’s Divine Comedy to their own lives.

  • Holding Class Virtually

    The dramatic snowstorms of February 2010 forced many professors to think creatively about how to continue with coursework when many were unable to come to campus. Three professors share their stories of holding class virtually.


History

  • Adam Rothman: Mapping the Underground Railroad

    In the Spring 2013 semester, the twenty-four students in Professor Adam Rothman’s History 286 Slavery in North America class mapped a small part of the Underground Railroad to Philadelphia in the 1850s.

  • Meredith McKittrick: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    In her Comparative History of the US and South Africa course, Meredith McKittrick introduced her students to the complexities of historical analysis and, in particular, to the ways in which historical narratives shape our understanding of current realities


International Affairs

  • Betsi Stephen: Creating a Lasting Learning Community

    After teaching a Freshman Proseminar in the School of Foreign Service for several years, Betsi Stephen was struck by the importance of the class for the students in their first year. She wondered how she could foster a sense of academic community among her students that would last across their four years at Georgetown.

  • Charles King: Empowering Students as Budding Experts

    Charles King wants his students to walk away with more than just a line on their transcripts or a grade; rather, he wants to develop their sense of scholarly expertise.

  • Daniel Sabet: Bringing a World of Resources into the Classroom

    After hearing Michael Wesch (Kansas State University) give a talk at CNDLS' Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Summer Institute on the possibilities of resource aggregation tools in the classroom, Daniel Sabet was eager to experiment with the model in his class on Politics and Policy at the US/Mexico Border.

  • Elizabeth Hervey Stephen: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Elizabeth Hervey Stephen designed her proseminar to introduce new students in the School of Foreign Service to key issues related to immigration in the 21st century. From the start, Stephen believed the seminar’s focus on immigration made it well suited to address themes central to the Doyle Initiative, such as diversity, tolerance, inclusion, and exclusion. Through a variety of assignments, she introduced students to how these themes are addressed by scholars and challenged them to re-think popularly held conceptions of race and ethnicity in light of what they studied in class.

  • Francis Slakey & Sarah Stoll: Global Solver

    Global Solver is a science policy communication tool that brings together scientists and policy makers to engage students in the search for innovative solutions to the critical challenges in the areas of energy, environment, global health, and security.

  • Interview with Carol Lancaster

    Carol Lancaster, Dean and Professor of Politics in the School of Foreign Service, talks about interdisciplinarity, the relationship between theory and practice, and how to educate students for the challenges of increasingly complex global issues.

  • Interview with Susan Martin

    Susan Martin shares some thoughts on her experiences teaching a class held jointly in DC and Doha, and reflects on how technology more generally has affected teaching and learning in her courses.

  • Interview with Tim Beach

    In an interview with Randy Bass, Tim Beach reflects on how his teaching and research practice have evolved and become more interdisciplinary. What follows are excerpts from that interview. Part of a series of interviews held for Georgetown University Faculty Convocation 2010.

  • Parina Patel: Giving Students Targeted Feedback through Online Learning

    For classes with a lab component, variability in lab sections is a perennial challenge that can complicate the consistency of the students' knowledge. When Parina Patel prepared her SFS statistics courses for the fall of 2012, she had an idea that would help mitigate that variability-- she decided to incorporate OLI, the "Open Learning Initiative," into her course.

  • Rochelle Davis: Wikipedia Project

    As part of the Wikipedia Public Policy Initiative, Rochelle Davis (SFS) asked her students to create or improve Wikipedia articles. This proved challenging for students, who were not used to writing for a public audience.

  • Shareen Joshi: Expanding Course Accessibility with OpenCourseWare

    Because Shareen Joshi recognizes the impact that openness and resource-sharing have had on her own education, she is committed to doing the same for her students, both formal students at Georgetown and informal students around the globe.


Language and Linguistics

  • Amadou Koné: Adapting Teaching Methods and Incorporating Student Feedback

    Originally from Côte d’Ivoire, French Professor Amadou Koné developed his teaching methods within the French lecture-based tradition. At Georgetown, however, Professor Koné has found that students in his literature and culture classes respond better to a more hands-on approach.

  • Astrid Weigert: Encouraging Participation and Developing Academic Writing Skills

    Astrid Weigert had never before taught a Gateway course, a required first-year writing intensive course for undergraduates, until she was asked to teach a class on Witches in History, Literature, and Film. Weigert found it difficult to engage the students in class discussions, and wanted to guide them to improve their academic writing.

  • Farima Mostowfi: Responding to the Challenges of Creating a New Program

    Having grown up speaking four languages (French, English, Persian/Farsi, and Azari), Professor Farima S. Mostowfi says that “language is part of my person, part of my personality.” She began teaching French at Georgetown in 2002, and by 2005 she had established Georgetown’s Persian Program, which is now part of the Division of Eastern Mediterranean Languages.

  • Intensifying Italian (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    For her introductory intensive Italian course, Dr. Fulvia Musti hoped to move beyond the typical listening comprehension activities based on audio-taped dialogues and textbook exercises. She turned to CNDLS to help her integrate authentic sources and cultural stimuli in the classroom.

  • Juei-chen Hsiao: Bringing the Language to the Students

    Professor Juei-Chen Hsiao draws on technology that students already use for personal communication, such as iChat and Facebook, to integrate Chinese language learning into their everyday lives.

  • Loredana Di Martino and Louise Hipwell: Teaching with Students’ Preferred Media

    Professors Loredana Di Martino and Louise Hipwell, who teach different sections of intensive basic and intermediate Italian, have found that collaborating on pedagogical projects has been enjoyable and productive for both themselves and their students.

  • Michael Ferreira: Enabling Students to Develop Conversational Skills through Social Networking Tools

    In Michael Ferreira’s introductory Portuguese course for advanced Spanish speakers, students cover the equivalent of four semesters of Portuguese grammar in just one intensive semester. Ferreira was challenged to devise new ways for students to practice conversation skills within this condensed version of the course sequence.

  • Natalie Khazaal: Preparing Students for Life After College

    One of Professor Natalie Khazaal’s goals in teaching Arabic was to move away from the traditional classroom design—where the teacher stands at the front of the room and the students are passive listeners—and instead encourage her students to become active co-creators of their learning.

  • Ron Leow: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Ron Leow, with the aid of his Assistant Director, German Zarate-Sandez, chose to transform one section of Advanced Spanish II by having students read articles on topics of contemporary difference and inclusion instead of the more typical literary pieces used in the advanced curriculum.

  • Sylvie Durmelat: Getting to the Heart of the Ignatius Seminar through Students' Stomachs

    Sylvie Durmelat decided to try a different approach to the Ignatius Seminar, a program designed specifically for first-semester freshmen, after attending a CNDLS workshop on blogging in the classroom. Durmelat’s course blog, “Food for Thought,” helps to challenge her own teaching strategies while also providing a friendly intellectual forum through which students can exchange ideas and conversation on the culture of eating.

  • Verónica Salles-Reese: Introducing Blogs to the Research Process

    In describing her teaching philosophy, Professor Verónica Salles-Reese says that she is “a firm believer that students have to be partners in their own education.”


Mathematics and Computer Science


Medicine and Health Sciences

  • Anne Rosenwald: Revolutionizing the Traditional Science Classroom, Regardless of Size

    Over the past fifteen years, Anne Rosenwald has come to realize that the collective brain power of her students is a much more powerful teaching tool than the stand-and-deliver lecture format. “Why not use that collective power by getting students involved in teaching each other and in independent research as much as possible?” asks Rosenwald.

  • Dan Merenstein: Teaching a Critical Approach to Scientific Literature

    When Dan Merenstein (Department of Family Medicine) had the chance to teach an undergraduate course, he wondered what skills would best prepare his students for their future in medical school or public health programs.

  • Holding Class Virtually

    The dramatic snowstorms of February 2010 forced many professors to think creatively about how to continue with coursework when many were unable to come to campus. Three professors share their stories of holding class virtually.

  • Inclusive Nursing (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    Given that her work in mental illness had always brought issues of diversity to the fore in the classroom, Dr. Edilma Yearwood, Assistant Professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies (SNHS) approached the week-long Inclusive Teaching and Learning (IT&L) Seminar as a way to meet like-minded people at the university with whom she could connect and establish ongoing relationships.

  • Janet Russell and Michael Hickey: How to Read a Science Paper

    To prepare graduate students to serve as teaching fellows in biology, CNDLS and the Department of Biology teamed up to create a course tailored to the needs of emerging biology instructors.

  • Kim Bullock: Portfolio-Blogs as Professional Development Tools

    Physician Kim Bullock, director of the Department of Family Medicine’s fellowship programs in community center director development and primary care health policy, is exploring how ePortfolios impact the learning experience of the fellows in these year-long programs.

  • Maria Donoghue: Engelhard Experience

    As an Engelhard Fellow, Maria has established close and trusting relationships with her biology students and worked to demystify afflictions such as mood disorders by breaking them down and analyzing them biologically.

  • Microbes and the Non-Major (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    After years of designing and redesigning her introductory biology course for non-majors in order to better engage non-science students in science, Heidi Elmendorf had turned to Blackboard as the latest in a series of innovations. She hoped to draw in her liberal arts students by getting them to engage with the material before class to be able to participate more fully in class discussion.

  • Nancy Crego: Using Lecture Capture to Make the Most of Time in the Classroom

    Nancy Crego (School of Nursing and Health Studies) was inspired to experiment with lecture capture technology when her class was cancelled due to bad weather. Rather than miss a day’s worth of content, she was determined to figure out a way to catch the students up.

  • Online Pediatric Training (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    While medical students usually know a lot about sophisticated imaging studies and exotic lab tests, they often don't know how to approach a patient, make a clinical diagnosis, and come to a sensible differential diagnostic hypothesis. With the help of CNDLS, Dr. Wolfgang Rennert designed a website on which students could work through case scenarios in order to practice their clinical thinking and decision making skills.


Philosophy and Ethics

  • Alisa Carse: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Alisa Carse focused on redesigning elements of her Introduction to Ethics course to build on already-central themes of respect, responsibility, and social justice. As a general education philosophy course with an average enrollment of around 200 students, this course offered the opportunity to engage a large swath of students in thinking about difference and diversity in the context of ethics early in their Georgetown careers. Carse utilized U.S. military experiences as a way to access the themes of the course.

  • Francis Slakey & Sarah Stoll: Global Solver

    Global Solver is a science policy communication tool that brings together scientists and policy makers to engage students in the search for innovative solutions to the critical challenges in the areas of energy, environment, global health, and security.

  • Frank Ambrosio: Fostering Contemplative Reading Practice through Digital Technology

    In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination, Frank Ambrosio found it difficult to teach students to move beyond basic levels of interpretation and to relate Dante’s Divine Comedy to their own lives.

  • Heather Voke: Engelhard Experience

    Since joining the project in Fall of 2006, Heather has sought to approach mental health issues from the perspective of civic engagement, having her students make connections between theory and direct experience in the community.

  • Marilyn McMorrow: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Marilyn McMorrow’s Religion, Ethics, and International Affairs course concentrated on religious and ethical contributions that can have a positive impact on world politics. Conscious of the diversity of her students and of the ways in which normative points of view can be reinforced in the classroom, McMorrow decided to utilize clicker technology to allow real-time, anonymous classroom polling.


Politics and Policy

  • Charles King: Empowering Students as Budding Experts

    Charles King wants his students to walk away with more than just a line on their transcripts or a grade; rather, he wants to develop their sense of scholarly expertise.

  • Daniel Sabet: Bringing a World of Resources into the Classroom

    After hearing Michael Wesch (Kansas State University) give a talk at CNDLS' Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Summer Institute on the possibilities of resource aggregation tools in the classroom, Daniel Sabet was eager to experiment with the model in his class on Politics and Policy at the US/Mexico Border.

  • Francis Slakey & Sarah Stoll: Global Solver

    Global Solver is a science policy communication tool that brings together scientists and policy makers to engage students in the search for innovative solutions to the critical challenges in the areas of energy, environment, global health, and security.

  • Interview with Carol Lancaster

    Carol Lancaster, Dean and Professor of Politics in the School of Foreign Service, talks about interdisciplinarity, the relationship between theory and practice, and how to educate students for the challenges of increasingly complex global issues.

  • Interview with Susan Martin

    Susan Martin shares some thoughts on her experiences teaching a class held jointly in DC and Doha, and reflects on how technology more generally has affected teaching and learning in her courses.

  • Interview with Tim Beach

    In an interview with Randy Bass, Tim Beach reflects on how his teaching and research practice have evolved and become more interdisciplinary. What follows are excerpts from that interview. Part of a series of interviews held for Georgetown University Faculty Convocation 2010.

  • Mark Rom: Evaluating Teaching Approaches

    “When I started teaching, it was all about me,” Mark Rom recalls. “I wanted to amuse my students.” After participating in sessions organized by CNDLS on the scholarship of teaching and learning, Rom began to rethink his teaching strategies, shifting instead to a more student-centered learning approach.

  • Mark Rom: Thinking About Politics Within a Large Class

    For his class Introduction to the U.S. Political System, a course that boasts an enrollment of nearly 150 students, Mark Rom turned to a course blog to help stimulate class discussion and personal interaction among students. Because class discussion can be intimidating in such a large class, Rom decided to integrate a course blog into his curriculum in order to ensure that all students had the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussion about American politics.

  • New Approaches for Improving Student Engagement in Large Enrollment Classes

    As part of the 2010 Provost's Seminar, CNDLS hosted a panel discussion on “New Approaches for Improving Student Engagement in Large Enrollment Classes. Panelists Mark Rom (Government), Matt Carnes (Government), Matt Hamilton (Biology), Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy), and Heidi Elmendorf (Biology), shared their experiences with a variety of technology-related pedagogical approaches.

  • Robin Kelley: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    For her Women’s Health and Human Rights course, Robin Kelley pushed students to engage with difference by designing opportunities for them to examine class topics from a variety of perspectives. Class goals included helping students become fluent in the vernacular of global health and develop an appreciation for the connection between women’s rights and human rights. Kelley also challenged students to recognize the intellectual and personal challenges that can often occur in cultural interactions and to embrace the social responsibilities of global citizenship.

  • Rochelle Davis: Wikipedia Project

    As part of the Wikipedia Public Policy Initiative, Rochelle Davis (SFS) asked her students to create or improve Wikipedia articles. This proved challenging for students, who were not used to writing for a public audience.

  • Shareen Joshi: Expanding Course Accessibility with OpenCourseWare

    Because Shareen Joshi recognizes the impact that openness and resource-sharing have had on her own education, she is committed to doing the same for her students, both formal students at Georgetown and informal students around the globe.


Sciences

  • Anne Rosenwald: Revolutionizing the Traditional Science Classroom, Regardless of Size

    Over the past fifteen years, Anne Rosenwald has come to realize that the collective brain power of her students is a much more powerful teaching tool than the stand-and-deliver lecture format. “Why not use that collective power by getting students involved in teaching each other and in independent research as much as possible?” asks Rosenwald.

  • Francis Slakey & Sarah Stoll: Global Solver

    Global Solver is a science policy communication tool that brings together scientists and policy makers to engage students in the search for innovative solutions to the critical challenges in the areas of energy, environment, global health, and security.

  • Gina Wimp: Challenging Students to Become Real Researchers

    Gina Wimp (Biology) began her teaching career by emulating her own professors who had largely relied on traditional lectures and textbooks. However, she soon realized that there were better ways to ignite students’ interest in the rapidly changing field of ecology.

  • Heidi Elmendorf: Active Learning through Practicing the Language of Science

    Engaging with science as an effective communicator and actively engaged learner, says Heidi Elmendorf, is not reserved for only the science-inclined, the pre-med, or the budding biologists among us. As an Associate Professor of Biology, Elmendorf has been instrumental in thinking about how all students can engage with science.

  • Janet Russell and Michael Hickey: How to Read a Science Paper

    To prepare graduate students to serve as teaching fellows in biology, CNDLS and the Department of Biology teamed up to create a course tailored to the needs of emerging biology instructors.

  • Maria Donoghue: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Maria Donoghue integrated the Doyle approach into her course through a unit analyzing the issue of sexual orientation from a neuro-biological perspective. Considering the biological bases of sexual orientation invited students to think about the ways that neurobiology affects behavior and raised broader questions about the relationship between nature and nurture in human life. From a social perspective, it inspired reflection on the stereotypes and biases associated with sexual orientation.

  • Maria Donoghue: Engelhard Experience

    As an Engelhard Fellow, Maria has established close and trusting relationships with her biology students and worked to demystify afflictions such as mood disorders by breaking them down and analyzing them biologically.

  • Microbes and the Non-Major (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    After years of designing and redesigning her introductory biology course for non-majors in order to better engage non-science students in science, Heidi Elmendorf had turned to Blackboard as the latest in a series of innovations. She hoped to draw in her liberal arts students by getting them to engage with the material before class to be able to participate more fully in class discussion.

  • New Approaches for Improving Student Engagement in Large Enrollment Classes

    As part of the 2010 Provost's Seminar, CNDLS hosted a panel discussion on “New Approaches for Improving Student Engagement in Large Enrollment Classes. Panelists Mark Rom (Government), Matt Carnes (Government), Matt Hamilton (Biology), Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy), and Heidi Elmendorf (Biology), shared their experiences with a variety of technology-related pedagogical approaches.

  • Optics Web Textbook (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    For an upper-level undergraduate course on optics for Physics majors, Prof. Ed Van Keuren envisioned a dynamic, "living" text that would offer students more than traditional optics textbooks can. Based on Prof. Van Keuren's needs, CNDLS designed a custom application, Optics WebText, a comprehensive online reference that allows for continual addition of new topics and revision of existing documents.

  • Peter Armbruster: Engaging Students in a Large Lecture Course through Interactive Pedagogies

    When faced with a large introductory biology class of over 170 students, Peter Armbruster was frustrated by the traditional “stand-and-deliver” lecture format, which left him feeling disconnected from his students.

  • Yuye Tong: Transforming Students into Independent Researchers through an Inquiry-Based Approach

    Students of YuYe Tong are often overwhelmed by the broad scope of his research on metal nanoparticles. Tong realizes that to cover all of the relevant material in lectures would be impossible; instead, his aim is to teach students how to learn.


Social Sciences

  • Leslie Hinkson: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Leslie Hinkson’s Race and Ethnic Relations course offers an introduction to classic and contemporary research on racial and ethnic relations in the United States. For the Doyle revision of the course, she created a new assignment that asked for students to write an “Identity Autobiography.” This autobiography allowed Hinkson to introduce the idea of difference by having students take careful note of their childhoods to theorize how race and ethnicity may have altered or influenced their fate differently. Through this exercise Hinkson challenged students to engage with theoretical literature about race and ethnicity as well as to examine the tension between individual diversity and collective group membership.

  • Resourceful Psychology (CNDLS Project Gallery)

    As part of a larger curricular project, the Psychology department wanted to find ways to support deep, recursive learning through electronic resources as students progressed through the major. CNDLS assisted the faculty and undergraduate students in developing and assessing a website that would serve as a "bridge" resource between the required "Research Methods and Statistics" course and the remaining courses in the major.

  • Rodney Collins: Maps Blog Creates a Collective Experience
  • Sarah Stiles: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    In revising her Law and Society course, Sarah Stiles undertook a dramatic “curriculum infusion” aimed at integrating Doyle Initiative values into all aspects of the course. In the first part of the course, students analyzed landmark Supreme Court decisions from the 20th century with issues of tolerance and diversity at their core. Later in the semester, Stiles asked students to research and teach their classmates about current “hot topics” that continue to test the limits of inclusion in the U.S. today. This activity allowed students to explore issues in detail that they found interesting and relevant to their lives and to their communities.

  • Sylvia Önder: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    In her Medical Anthropology course, Sylvia Önder wanted to push students to think about difference in new ways. Specifically, she focused on the experiences of those with “diverse abilities” and of students who are veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  • W. Gerrod Parrott: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    Gerrod Parrott encouraged his students to apply the Social Psychology course themes of diversity and tolerance to real-world conflict and cooperation. As he explained, "people always learn more if they're applying the material to their own lives, and they encode it more richly and deeply if they're thinking about how they can actually use it."

  • Yulia Chentsova Dutton: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    In teaching her Cultural Psychology course, Yulia Chentsova Dutton has found that students are more likely to see how culture shapes the attitudes and beliefs of people of other cultures than they are to recognize the cultural impact on their own attitudes and beliefs. However, this lack of self-awareness compromises the students' understanding of people whom they see as culturally different. In her Doyle revision of this course, Chentsova Dutton focused on helping students to see more deeply the interactions between individuals and culture so that they might recognize how these interactions shape their own attitudes and beliefs.


Theology and Religion

  • Clare Wilde: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    When Clare Wilde explained to her students the Doyle-inspired focus of her Problem of God course, she did not know how they would take to the themes of diversity, empathy, and tolerance. The course took a felicitous and unexpected turn when a South Korean student asked to engage these themes by doing a presentation for the class on the religious traditions of his homeland in order to complement the Mediterranean- and Euro-influenced focus of the other course content.

  • Frank Ambrosio: Fostering Contemplative Reading Practice through Digital Technology

    In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination, Frank Ambrosio found it difficult to teach students to move beyond basic levels of interpretation and to relate Dante’s Divine Comedy to their own lives.

  • Julia Lamm: Engelhard Experience

    Through the Engelhard Project, Julia addresses with her students how we deal (or try not to deal) with human experiences, such as anxiety, alienation, meaning and meaninglessness, joy, intimacy, courage and trust.


Visual and Performing Arts and Film Studies

  • Bernie Cook: Deepening Critical Understanding of American Studies

    Although Film Studies programs have long kept a distinct separation between production courses and critical theory courses, Bernie Cook wondered how he could incorporate production into a critical theory class, and how this would help his students to think critically about American Studies.

  • Natsu Onoda Power: Blogs as Embodied Learning

    Natsu Onoda Power, a professor in Georgetown's Department of Performing Arts, has been using blogs in a variety of her courses for years. After much experimentation and some setbacks, Onoda Power feels that she has finally figured out how to use blogs meaningfully and effectively in her performance courses, making the blogging process rewarding for both herself and her students.

  • Natsu Onoda Power: Doyle Faculty Fellow

    For the Doyle redesign of Natsu Onoda Power’s Adaptation and Performance of Literature course, she worked to bring in issues of diversity and difference in both ‘overt’ ways (class exercises and assignments) and more ‘covert’ ways (guiding discussion or critiques to invite student reflection on such issues). One aspect of the course invited students to reflect on their campus life and to use performance theory to make the campus more “livable” for others.



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